(BPT) - Ever wonder why some songs can literally send shivers down your spine or give you goosebumps? It’s clear music can trigger physical reactions,[i],[ii],[iii] but what may not be as well known is that it might also be good for your health — especially for people living with central nervous system diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). An initiative called MS in Harmony is harnessing the effect of music therapy to help people impacted by MS achieve harmony of the body and mind. You can visit MSinHarmony.com for more information and to try out interactive music therapy-informed video exercises, facilitated by credentialed music therapists and specifically designed for people living with MS.


[i] Mori K, Iwanaga M. Two types of peak emotional responses to music: The psychophysiology of chills and tears. Sci Rep. 2017;7:46063. Published 2017 Apr 7. doi:10.1038/srep46063.

[ii] Blood AJ, Zatorre RJ. Intensely pleasurable responses to music correlate with activity in brain regions implicated in reward and emotion. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001;98(20):11818-11823. doi:10.1073/pnas.191355898.

[iii] Arjmand H-A, Hohagen J, Paton B and Rickard NS (2017) Emotional Responses to Music: Shifts in Frontal Brain Asymmetry Mark Periods of Musical Change. Front. Psychol. 8:2044. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02044.

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