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The Everett Area School District finished the past fiscal year with more revenue than expenses.

Brad Koontz, a certified public accountant with the Bedford-based firm Ritchey, Ritchey and Koontz, updated the district’s school board on the 2018-19 audit during the board’s meeting Monday night.

The district had $21.04 million in revenue for the year — about $550,000 more than its expenses.

The district last June had budgeted for an approximate $294,000 deficit — about $20.05 million in revenue and $20.4 million in expenses.

“Like most districts, you try to budget your revenues a little lower than expected, and expenditures a little higher to be conservative,” Koontz said. “I think we did well compared to the budget.”

The district had a fund balance of $2.9 million as of June 30. Koontz noted the district transferred about $643,000 from the fund balance to its capital projects fund during the year. The capital projects fund was at $4.2 million on June 30.

“We’re satisfied with the budget,” Superintendent Danny Webb said after the meeting.

“Our expenditures were very close to our expected expenditures. The budget was right on track with what was projected,” Webb said.

Koontz said while there was a surplus in revenue, the total was in line with a balanced spending plan.

“When you talk about a $21 million budget, percentage wise, it’s within reason of where you should be with a budget that size,” he said.

Local sources, including real estate taxes, accounted for $8.97 million of revenues, while state sources totaled $11.18 million and federal funding was at about $893,000.

The school board also was updated on the district’s state testing scores from the past year. Assistant Superintendent Jim Hollis and Justin Hillegas, elementary school principal, provided the presentation.

Hollis and Hillegas went through the scores students in grades 3 through 8 had in the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment testing.

Hollis said the scores were generally above other districts in the state that are similar demographically based on the number of students in historically underperforming groups, including students in special education and those who receive free or reduced lunch.

“There are three groups, two of which we have in our district,” Hollis said. “There are special education students and free and reduced lunch students. They historically perform lower on the state tests than the average student.”

Hollis said 61 percent of students in Everett received free or reduced lunch in 2018-19, compared to 50 percent across Bedford County and 44 percent statewide.

In Everett, 59% of students in grades 3 through 8 were proficient or advanced in English, below the 63% statewide average. Everett was above the 44% average in districts with similar demographics.

In math, 40 percent of Everett students in elementary and middle schools were proficient or advanced, compared to 45 percent statewide. About 27 percent were proficient or advanced in similar demographic districts.

Everett was above the state average in science, with 73% proficient or advanced compared to the 70 percent.

For the Keystone Exams in the high school, Everett finished above the state averages in literature, but were below the state averages in biology and math.

—In algebra 1, students were below the state average of about 63% with 51%.

—In biology, students were below the state average of about 63% with 60%.

—In literature, students exceeded the state average of 71.5% with 76%.

Contact Will DeShong at wdeshong@bedfordgazette.com; 623-1151, ext. 150.

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